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National News
  • U.S. authorities investigate suspected threat against Obama: reports

    U.S. President Obama arrives onboard Air Force One at Westchester County Airport in White Plains, New York(Reuters) - Authorities in Connecticut on Friday were investigating a possible threat against President Barack Obama, local media reported. The U.S. Secret Service, which is responsible for presidential security, issued a statement saying, "Information has been received by law enforcement regarding a potentially suspicious person and vehicle. We are working with our local law enforcement partners to determine the validity of the information provided. ...


  • Florida schools make play for scholastic chess curriculum
    By Zachary Fagenson FORT LAUDERDALE Fla. (Reuters) - Leaning over chess boards in the middle of classes, seven- and eight-year-olds in one of Florida's largest school districts furrow their brows as they plot moves toward a checkmate. The chess games are part of a weekly lesson given to all 34,000 second- and third-graders in Broward County Public Schools, the sixth-biggest district in the nation, in one of the largest such curriculum experiments in the country. "The act of sitting and filling in a bubble sheet is work." The initiative builds on growing numbers of school-age children playing chess in the United States. Along with Florida, thousands of students in New York City and Chicago are learning chess in school, also taught in major districts in Texas, Michigan and Washington state, among others.
  • U.S. judge halts major part of Texas law restricting abortions
    District Judge Lee Yeakel said the so-called "ambulatory surgical center requirement" was unjust because it placed an undue burden on women by reducing the number of clinics where they could seek abortions and the regulations had no compelling public health interests. "The court concludes, after examining the act and the context in which it operates, that the ambulatory-surgical center requirement was intended to close existing licensed abortion clinics," Yeakel wrote in the decision. The requirement was to have gone into effect on Sept. 1. Under it, clinics would have had to meet a set of building standards ranging from widening halls to having facilities for certain surgeries that abortion rights advocates said were unnecessary, especially when an abortion is medically induced.
  • Study: Novel heart failure drug shows big promise
    A new study reports one of the biggest potential advances against heart failure in more than a decade. Doctors say that a first-of-a-kind, experimental drug cut the chances of death or hospitalization by about 20 percent.
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